That Little Italian Kitchen

That Little Italian Kitchen

More about Little Owl Italian Kitchen Michelle King and Oscar Simo Deleon, co-owners of Little Owl Italian Kitchen, also own the ‘burger.’ venues in Santa Cruz and Aptos; Matt Walthard is director of operations for all three restaurants. Little Owl’s chef, Grant Kester, has been with the team since 2015 and ran the sushi program at Kauboi, which was transformed intio Little Owl.‘Grant went to culinary school in San Diego and worked at several places there including Clouds restaurant before coming to this area,’ Matt notes. ‘Grant and I collaborated on Little Owl’s menu.’Walthard’s own restaurant background started with a first job washing dishes; he progressed to working in the kitchen and front-of-house and corporate duties. His restaurant work has taken him as far afield as Hard Rock Café in New York City. The decision to transform Kauboi into Little Owl was based on several factors, says Matt, who attended high school in Santa Cruz County.‘There’s a void for Italian food in Aptos, a place to feed the family,’ he comments. ‘It’s something we wanted to do. First we considered a little Italian sandwich shop and then expanded on that idea.’Walthard points out that Little Owl uses a Mugnaini wood-fired oven and that the menu offers a gluten-free Bigoli pasta option. The team plans to add late-night pizza specials soon, he says, as well as desserts such as tiramisu and frozen custard. Little Owl’s most popular menu items include the Domenica and Diavolo pasta dishes and the Rocket Salad, says Matt. ‘And pizza does very well, especially the pepperoni pizza: We use Fresno peppers and a high quality pepperoni. It’s my favorite, although I love the meatball pizza.’ He adds, ‘As far as pasta, my favorites are the Domenica and the five-cheese ravioli — for my last meal I might choose that ravioli with Bolognese sauce and meatballs.’
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That Little Italian Kitchen

Bill Tonelli from New York magazine said, “Once, Little Italy was like an insular Neapolitan village re-created on these shores, with its own language, customs, and financial and cultural institutions.” Little Italy was not the largest Italian neighborhood in New York City, as East Harlem (or Italian Harlem) had a larger Italian population. Tonelli said that Little Italy “was perhaps the city’s poorest Italian neighborhood”. In 1910 Little Italy had almost 10,000 Italians; that was the peak of the community’s Italian population. At the turn of the 20th century over 90% of the residents of the Fourteenth Ward were of Italian birth or origins. Tonnelli said that it meant “that residents began moving out to more spacious digs almost as soon as they arrived.” Such a vastly gowing community impacted the “U.S. labor movement in the 20th century” by making up much of the labor population in the garment industry”.
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That Little Italian Kitchen

Michelle King and Oscar Simo Deleon, co-owners of Little Owl Italian Kitchen, also own the ‘burger.’ venues in Santa Cruz and Aptos; Matt Walthard is director of operations for all three restaurants. Little Owl’s chef, Grant Kester, has been with the team since 2015 and ran the sushi program at Kauboi, which was transformed intio Little Owl.‘Grant went to culinary school in San Diego and worked at several places there including Clouds restaurant before coming to this area,’ Matt notes. ‘Grant and I collaborated on Little Owl’s menu.’Walthard’s own restaurant background started with a first job washing dishes; he progressed to working in the kitchen and front-of-house and corporate duties. His restaurant work has taken him as far afield as Hard Rock Café in New York City. The decision to transform Kauboi into Little Owl was based on several factors, says Matt, who attended high school in Santa Cruz County.‘There’s a void for Italian food in Aptos, a place to feed the family,’ he comments. ‘It’s something we wanted to do. First we considered a little Italian sandwich shop and then expanded on that idea.’Walthard points out that Little Owl uses a Mugnaini wood-fired oven and that the menu offers a gluten-free Bigoli pasta option. The team plans to add late-night pizza specials soon, he says, as well as desserts such as tiramisu and frozen custard. Little Owl’s most popular menu items include the Domenica and Diavolo pasta dishes and the Rocket Salad, says Matt. ‘And pizza does very well, especially the pepperoni pizza: We use Fresno peppers and a high quality pepperoni. It’s my favorite, although I love the meatball pizza.’ He adds, ‘As far as pasta, my favorites are the Domenica and the five-cheese ravioli — for my last meal I might choose that ravioli with Bolognese sauce and meatballs.’
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That Little Italian Kitchen

Our family has been in the Italian Restaurant and Pizza business since 1949, establishing Italy’s Little Kitchen in 1971. We have won numerous awards for our outstanding recipes, which use only the healthiest and freshest ingredients. We stand by the principle that our customers should be shown the same hospitality we would offer a guest in our own home. Which is why Italy’s Little Kitchen has been the most popular neighborhood Italian restaurant in Westchester for over 35 years. We hope you will continue to enjoy dining in our restaurant and thank you for your patronage. Join Our Email List
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That Little Italian Kitchen

AUTHENTIC ITALIAN + REASONABLE PRICES. A friend recommended this little gem. Even though the name says “little,” they had more seating than what I thought they would have. There's also a separate room that they must allow for parties–this would be awesome for large family gatherings. My table ordered the Baked Penne Pasta and a Large Pizza with Pepperoni and Mushrooms. I was impressed with the pasta. The sauce was sweet, the cheese was plenty and the pasta was a decent quality (much better than your typical chain Italian restaurants). The pizza was decent. I thought the crust was okay, but not really exciting. The toppings however, made up for the fact of the “okay” crust. The pepperoni, cheese, and mushroom tasted higher quality than your average pizza place–so that was a plus. Don't go here if you are in a hurry. The service was very slow–both the kitchen seemed to take forever and the server was polite, yet I felt like you had to ask for everything. I didn't mind the wait since we weren't in a hurry, but it would be a pain if I had big plans afterwards.
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That Little Italian Kitchen

Little Italy on Mulberry Street used to extend as far south as Worth Street, as far north as Houston Street, as far west as Lafayette Street, and as far east as Bowery. It is now only three blocks on Mulberry Street. Little Italy originated as Mulberry Bend. Jacob Riis described Mulberry Bend as “the foul core of New York’s slums.” During this time period “Immigrants of the late 19th century usually settled in ethnic neighborhood”. Therefore, the “mass immigration from italy during the 1880’s” led to the large settlement of Italian immigrants in lower manhattan. The results of such migration had created an “influx of Italian immigrants” which had “led to the commercial gathering of their dwelling and business”.
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That Little Italian Kitchen

As of the 2000 U.S. Census, 1,211 residents claiming Italian ancestry lived in three census tracts that make up Little Italy. Those residents comprise 8.25% of the population in the community, which is similar to the proportion of those of Italian ancestry throughout New York City. Bill Tonelli of New York magazine contrasted Little Italy with the Manhattan Chinatown; in 2000, of the residents of the portions of Chinatown south of Grand Street, 81% were of Chinese origins.
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Little Italy is a neighborhood in lower Manhattan, New York City, once known for its large population of Italian Americans. Today the neighborhood consists of only a few Italian stores and restaurants. It is bounded on the west by Tribeca and Soho, on the south by Chinatown, on the east by the Bowery and Lower East Side, and on the north by Nolita.
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‘There’s a void for Italian food in Aptos, a place to feed the family,’ he comments. ‘It’s something we wanted to do. First we considered a little Italian sandwich shop and then expanded on that idea.’
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In 2004 Tonelli said “Today, Little Italy is a veneer—50 or so restaurants and cafés catering to tourists, covering a dense neighborhood of tenements shared by recent Chinese immigrants, young Americans who can’t afford Soho, and a few remaining real live Italians.” This sentiment has also been echoed by Italian culture and heritage website ItalianAware. The site has called the dominance of Italians in the area, “relatively short lived.” It attributes this to the quick financial prosperity many Italians achieved, which afforded them the opportunity to leave the cramped neighborhood for areas in Brooklyn and Queens. The site also goes on to state that the area is currently referred to as Little Italy more out of nostalgia than as a reflection of a true ethnic population.
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That Little Italian Kitchen Unclaimed This business has not yet been claimed by the owner or a representative. Claim this business to view business statistics, receive messages from prospective customers, and respond to reviews.